Here we go again. Dorian is a f***ing monster...

Grimson

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Sorry didnt realize there was a thread about this since I mostly post in B&I so just responded to talk of Trump's Cat 5 comments.

Live in Nassau which was not in Storms path but currently island wide power outtage but internet and phone lines working.

Abaco and Grand Bahama are pretty much fucked as Dorian moving so slow (at one point 1 mph) that it is basically just squattimg on Grand Bahama right now.

Tried to post vids but wont let me post Mp4 files on my phone.
Glad you are okay my friend. Do you have family in any of the NW islands?
 

MarylandBear111

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Hurricane Dorian is like that chick who says she is down to party but really isn't. She is giving way too many mixed signals and leaving the U.S with blue balls. If she keeps on this same track, I could see her being a #metoo victim.
 

remydat

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so like south of Baha Mar?---Are you in the middle of the island? I bet you got some winds though even where you are at huh?
About 7-10 minutes west of Baha Mar. Lost some trees and had heavy rain but not too bad. I actually grilled and had a fantasy draft by me at 7pm before shit hit the fan later. Power went out 3:30am. 30% of power has been restored but mostly in the East so my power is still off. All and all though much worse in Abaco and Freeport so can't complain.
 
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remydat

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Glad you are okay my friend. Do you have family in any of the NW islands?
No family but some friends and coworkers in the thick of it in Freeport, Grand Bahama right now. We are in contact with them via whatsapp.

There are 5 confirmed deaths in Abaco and that number expected to rise as reports of bodies floating in water.

Generally homes and buildings built to withstand Cat 4 but it being Cat 5 and hitting areas where Haitian immigrants had put up shantytowns means a lot of homes destroyed.
 
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remydat

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I should also add, Kudos to the US Coast Guard as they flew in helicopters to take some of the critically injured in Abaco here to Nassau.
 

MarylandBear111

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About 7-10 minutes west of Baha Mar. Lost some trees and had heavy rain but not too bad. I actually grilled and had a fantasy draft by me at 7pm before shit hit the fan later. Power went out 3:30am. 30% of power has been restored but mostly in the East so my power is still off. All and all though much worse in Abaco and Freeport so can't complain.
Okay, now I have to know what you do for a living and how I can come down there and live too!!!!!
 

dennehy

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I've seen some incredibly awful images coming in from Abaco, reports of many dead. And Freeport is taking a much worse battering. Those island only get a couple or a few dozen feet above sea level and the storm surge was over 20 feet in lots of places.
 

remydat

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Power largely restored in Nassau but we lost contact with coworkers in Grand Bahama. Hoping that is just because their cell phones finally died. Now it is a waiting game as Dorian is stationary and expected to spend another day and night battering Grand Bahama. This is unreal that it is just squatting on top of an island.
 

nvanprooyen

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Power largely restored in Nassau but we lost contact with coworkers in Grand Bahama. Hoping that is just because their cell phones finally died. Now it is a waiting game as Dorian is stationary and expected to spend another day and night battering Grand Bahama. This is unreal that it is just squatting on top of an island.
Saw this explanation from a met on Reddit. Thought it was interesting:

The closest meteorological term I can think of to describe this phenomenon is called a [**col**](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Col_\(meteorology\)).


There are two primary competing mid-level features acting upon Hurricane Dorian right now. There's a subtropical ridge situated to the northeast which is trying to push the cyclone westward. There's also a mid-latitude trough to the north that's trying to push the cyclone northeastward. Over the next 12 to 24 hours, the ridge is expected to expand westward, pushing Dorian toward the west.

But at the same time, the trough to the north is expected to deepen, drawing the cyclone toward the north. The combination of both of these things happening will result in Dorian moving initially toward the northwest but then curving toward the northeast as it rounds the axis of the ridge. The more embedded the cyclone becomes within the southwesterly flow of the trough, the faster it is expected to travel. That's why it appears to shoot across the Atlantic over the next few days in the National Hurricane Center's forecast graphic.

Imagine it's like a metal ball sitting on a bed sheet that's stretched out. The trough is like a weight pulling down a section of the sheet from beneath, creating a depression. The ridge is like someone's hands sweeping across the sheet from beneath, pushing the ball. Well, what's basically expected to happen is like pushing the ball toward the left, only for it to curve upward and fall into the depression.
 

Scoot26

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Saw this explanation from a met on Reddit. Thought it was interesting:

The closest meteorological term I can think of to describe this phenomenon is called a [**col**](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Col_\(meteorology\)).


There are two primary competing mid-level features acting upon Hurricane Dorian right now. There's a subtropical ridge situated to the northeast which is trying to push the cyclone westward. There's also a mid-latitude trough to the north that's trying to push the cyclone northeastward. Over the next 12 to 24 hours, the ridge is expected to expand westward, pushing Dorian toward the west.

But at the same time, the trough to the north is expected to deepen, drawing the cyclone toward the north. The combination of both of these things happening will result in Dorian moving initially toward the northwest but then curving toward the northeast as it rounds the axis of the ridge. The more embedded the cyclone becomes within the southwesterly flow of the trough, the faster it is expected to travel. That's why it appears to shoot across the Atlantic over the next few days in the National Hurricane Center's forecast graphic.

Imagine it's like a metal ball sitting on a bed sheet that's stretched out. The trough is like a weight pulling down a section of the sheet from beneath, creating a depression. The ridge is like someone's hands sweeping across the sheet from beneath, pushing the ball. Well, what's basically expected to happen is like pushing the ball toward the left, only for it to curve upward and fall into the depression.
I've been hearing this hurricane parking thing is very rare, but I've now seen it 4 times since 2016, Matthew, Harvey, Florence, and now Dorian.

Matthew parked below Cuba for awhile until moving. The others seemed to park over land. Dorian is the strongest of them though. Harvey and Florence were mainly just rain when it was parked.

Wonder if Climate change is making it more common.
 

dennehy

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Saw this explanation from a met on Reddit. Thought it was interesting:

The closest meteorological term I can think of to describe this phenomenon is called a [**col**](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Col_\(meteorology\)).


There are two primary competing mid-level features acting upon Hurricane Dorian right now. There's a subtropical ridge situated to the northeast which is trying to push the cyclone westward. There's also a mid-latitude trough to the north that's trying to push the cyclone northeastward. Over the next 12 to 24 hours, the ridge is expected to expand westward, pushing Dorian toward the west.

But at the same time, the trough to the north is expected to deepen, drawing the cyclone toward the north. The combination of both of these things happening will result in Dorian moving initially toward the northwest but then curving toward the northeast as it rounds the axis of the ridge. The more embedded the cyclone becomes within the southwesterly flow of the trough, the faster it is expected to travel. That's why it appears to shoot across the Atlantic over the next few days in the National Hurricane Center's forecast graphic.

Imagine it's like a metal ball sitting on a bed sheet that's stretched out. The trough is like a weight pulling down a section of the sheet from beneath, creating a depression. The ridge is like someone's hands sweeping across the sheet from beneath, pushing the ball. Well, what's basically expected to happen is like pushing the ball toward the left, only for it to curve upward and fall into the depression.
As much as they suck, hurricanes are really interesting. I've always been interested in weather, but moving to the southeast coast has really brought out the weather nerd.
 
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