Gardening

RacerX

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That sounds lie it would be really good. It's hard to imagine the true flavor of all that stuff together. I love eggplant though, never had it in soup though.
The eggplant stew ended up with the consistency of a chunky chili.

Another option I recommend - if you cook and eat stir-fry - is to roast your large bulb eggplants on the grill. I wrap the\ eggplants in heavy foil and set them on the grill rack for 40 minutes at around 425 degrees, and i flip them over every 10 minutes or so. Let them cool off and then spoon out the creamy interior, drain the juice, and then throw the drained insides into your wok along with the other ingredients. It adds a great smoky and comforting flavor to the other vegetables (or meats).
 

Burque

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I have started making hot sauces with my peppers.

I made a batch of habanero sauce, a batch of Thai chile and jalapeno sauce, and a batch of ghost pepper sauce. I am getting good at making sauces that nobody can consume without crying.

I haven't tasted any of the most recent sauces yet, just the previous mixtures that I did early in the season. Just the act of making these three sauces caused me to break out into coughing fits and sweating for hours after breathing it in. I am planning on eating some with a buddy who likes hot chit soon, but to be honest, I am scared.

This leaves me with the understanding that I have scorpion peppers on the vine, nearly a dozen on one plant, and reapers, 7 pots, and mambas all flowering, I am legitimately scared. I am not sure how I am going to make hot sauces that make sense with these peppers. My plan currently is to tame them out with butternut squash and carrots which I have grown an abundance of. I am not sure of the correct prep method @DC If you have any ideas about tying flavors and heat together I would love to hear them. My plan currently involves a combo of roasting and boiling.

I am not into the fermentation side just yet and finding that boiling has been the best way I have found so far.

Is anyone else into the ultra hot peppers?
 

Tater

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I have started making hot sauces with my peppers.

I made a batch of habanero sauce, a batch of Thai chile and jalapeno sauce, and a batch of ghost pepper sauce. I am getting good at making sauces that nobody can consume without crying.

I haven't tasted any of the most recent sauces yet, just the previous mixtures that I did early in the season. Just the act of making these three sauces caused me to break out into coughing fits and sweating for hours after breathing it in. I am planning on eating some with a buddy who likes hot chit soon, but to be honest, I am scared.

This leaves me with the understanding that I have scorpion peppers on the vine, nearly a dozen on one plant, and reapers, 7 pots, and mambas all flowering, I am legitimately scared. I am not sure how I am going to make hot sauces that make sense with these peppers. My plan currently is to tame them out with butternut squash and carrots which I have grown an abundance of. I am not sure of the correct prep method @DC If you have any ideas about tying flavors and heat together I would love to hear them. My plan currently involves a combo of roasting and boiling.

I am not into the fermentation side just yet and finding that boiling has been the best way I have found so far.

Is anyone else into the ultra hot peppers?

You could always send some hot sauce to a few select members here. I love hot stuff and volunteer to be a taste tester. :)
 

DC

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I have started making hot sauces with my peppers.

I made a batch of habanero sauce, a batch of Thai chile and jalapeno sauce, and a batch of ghost pepper sauce. I am getting good at making sauces that nobody can consume without crying.

I haven't tasted any of the most recent sauces yet, just the previous mixtures that I did early in the season. Just the act of making these three sauces caused me to break out into coughing fits and sweating for hours after breathing it in. I am planning on eating some with a buddy who likes hot chit soon, but to be honest, I am scared.

This leaves me with the understanding that I have scorpion peppers on the vine, nearly a dozen on one plant, and reapers, 7 pots, and mambas all flowering, I am legitimately scared. I am not sure how I am going to make hot sauces that make sense with these peppers. My plan currently is to tame them out with butternut squash and carrots which I have grown an abundance of. I am not sure of the correct prep method @DC If you have any ideas about tying flavors and heat together I would love to hear them. My plan currently involves a combo of roasting and boiling.

I am not into the fermentation side just yet and finding that boiling has been the best way I have found so far.

Is anyone else into the ultra hot peppers?
Not sure,Boss. But the Hatch Green CHILE roasters are all over Federal BLVD and I picked up about 50 lbs this morning. Steaming now. Will peel, chop and freeze shortly. My first batch with roasted. Can't wait.
 

Burque

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Not sure,Boss. But the Hatch Green CHILE roasters are all over Federal BLVD and I picked up about 50 lbs this morning. Steaming now. Will peel, chop and freeze shortly. My first batch with roasted. Can't wait.
It is getting close to time for me to pick up a batch, I am seeing it showing up with red mixed in and that is usually the sign to go get it.

I get it from a place here called Nelsons meat market. It is a small butcher that bought a little caesers that went out of business in the slot next to him in a strip mall. He bought the place so he could get the pizza ovens, which is what he roasts the chile on. Life changing as it comes out PERFECT.
 

Burque

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You could always send some hot sauce to a few select members here. I love hot stuff and volunteer to be a taste tester. :)

I wouldn't want to get in trouble for assaulting another forum member with my knock you on your ass hot sauces. These last couple batches are fuck all hot.
 

RacerX

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I wouldn't want to get in trouble for assaulting another forum member with my knock you on your ass hot sauces. These last couple batches are fuck all hot.
How do you consume your face-melting sauces? Do they not overpower the underlying foods?
 

Burque

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How do you consume your face-melting sauces? Do they not overpower the underlying foods?
There is a lot of ways to temper so that people can enjoy them.

Personally, I like my food spicy and I do not think they are overpowering. I am sure someone that doesn't do very spicy food often would think I was a crazy person. Even my wife has her limits, as some of the sauces I make she won't bother tasting even a fingertip worth. She will put a little on food at times to try them, but there are other ways.

You can mix with sour cream or cream cheese to temper. You can add to your cooking in small amounts to add some heat and flavor without overpowering. I will eventually begin using carrots and squash to step things back, but I am currently just trying to get an understanding and SOP for creating my base sauces. IE: How much salt, sugar (if any), vinegar/water, to de-seed or not. How long do I boil, things like that. Also looking for what makes a good color combination. Because sometimes when you mix too many things you just get an orangey brown bleh looking sauce and I prefer the color to pop as well as the flavor and heat.

I don't recommend eating them straight out of the jar with a spoon. Although, that is how I taste them for flavoring, salt levels, etc. I just take like a tablespoon full, put it in a small pyrex dish, and then just taste little dabs of it to see where I am at heat wise as well as flavor wise.
 

Burque

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@RacerX

For some perspective the previous batch I made was the best tasting batch to date, but it was ugly it is on the left. Tastes delicious, really hot, too hot for my wife but right on for me.

It was Jalapenos, Habaneros, and Ghost peppers with vinegar, salt, and a dash of sugar.

The next three were all made this week and I haven't opened yet to taste as I like to give them a week or two to sit in the fridge before consuming. they are as follows.

Small jar - Red Jalapenos and Thai chile peppers with vinegar, salt and sugar.

Yellow jar - Habaneros (Which are wicked hot this year) Vinegar, salt, and sugar.

Far right - Ghost peppers, vinegar, and salt. no sugar, It was making me choke as I poured it out of the blender.

They are all very basic, but getting the ratios right makes them tasty. I have found through this journey of smoking meats and making hot sauces that simple is usually better. especially when you are just starting out. I have made some sauces that had too much stuff in them and they were just muddled and honestly, not good. So this is a focus on the pepper flavors and heat with dashes of compliments.

ohhh, it is also helpful that all the peppers are right outside my back door growing out of the dirt. Makes it easy to try stuff and if you dislike it its not like you have some major investment other than watering/gardening.
 
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DC

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It is getting close to time for me to pick up a batch, I am seeing it showing up with red mixed in and that is usually the sign to go get it.

I get it from a place here called Nelsons meat market. It is a small butcher that bought a little caesers that went out of business in the slot next to him in a strip mall. He bought the place so he could get the pizza ovens, which is what he roasts the chile on. Life changing as it comes out PERFECT.
Yes, our "basket"is about 1/4 red. Peeling thess motherfuckers is making me cough.
 

Burque

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The heat finally bailed out a little down here and everything is seeking much happier.
 

Burque

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I had moved all of my overwintered plants out onto the back patio for a week or two and then the cold came back so I pulled everything back in. Hard Freeze warning tonight, cold night tomorrow and then we are smooth sailing again.

Running 25 ultra hot peppers this year at a minimum, may pick up some more. The mix this year is Reapers, Scorpions, and ghost pepper plants. few other stragglers in there, but that is the majority I am working with this year.

I've got 4 tomato plants and may get a couple more. I hope we get tomatoes this year, last year I had a total crop failure on 4 of the 5 tomatoes I planted, it was a strange hot/cold/new soil mix year and things just never really popped off.

The garden box volunteered onions, garlic chives, lettuce, and some carrots and parsnips.

Also there is a patch of cilantro growing over by my water catch barrel. interesting. Not going to complain if that comes back every year.

will add some other things I am sure, but I am not planting squash in the box this year. The squash beetles found me last year so if I am planting that it is going in a segregated area.
 

Spunky Porkstacker

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I had moved all of my overwintered plants out onto the back patio for a week or two and then the cold came back so I pulled everything back in. Hard Freeze warning tonight, cold night tomorrow and then we are smooth sailing again.

Running 25 ultra hot peppers this year at a minimum, may pick up some more. The mix this year is Reapers, Scorpions, and ghost pepper plants. few other stragglers in there, but that is the majority I am working with this year.

I've got 4 tomato plants and may get a couple more. I hope we get tomatoes this year, last year I had a total crop failure on 4 of the 5 tomatoes I planted, it was a strange hot/cold/new soil mix year and things just never really popped off.

The garden box volunteered onions, garlic chives, lettuce, and some carrots and parsnips.

Also there is a patch of cilantro growing over by my water catch barrel. interesting. Not going to complain if that comes back every year.

will add some other things I am sure, but I am not planting squash in the box this year. The squash beetles found me last year so if I am planting that it is going in a segregated area.
Michigan, or maybe it's just the Detroit area has banned all sales of garden seeds.🤯
 

Crystallas

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How do you consume your face-melting sauces? Do they not overpower the underlying foods?
You have to build up your heat/capsicum tolerances. Then you can eventually enjoy the flavor of some of the hottest peppers. Same with sharp cheeses (what you can buy at the grocery store is nothing in terms of sharpness). AITC, like Garlic, Mustard, Horseradish, and Wasabi. Pepperines are the same thing, but most people can develop their tolerances quickly with even the strongest pink peppers (which is oddly doesn't even pass GRAS standards by the FDA.)
 

Crystallas

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I caged up my herbs, and the frost fucked me. Basically need to start from scratch for my outside garden. The greenhouse is a mess, as I haven't had time to sort and fix everything this last year.

Thinking about getting one of those Droll Yankee bird feeders, not to invite birds, but to distract squirrels. If not the frost, the tree rats have been going crazy in my area. And I have done ALL of the preventative trimming and deterrents with no luck. So hoping the cages work. I'm tempted to do some traps if they keep digging up my roots. I had some very rare plants destroyed by squirrels last year, even with cages and taking other measures to protect them. Last step is poison, which is ineffective but works if you decide to invest every waking moment into eradicating the local population and don't care if your garden is also poisoned. So yeah, pretty shitty.

That leads me to raising awareness for those of you that trim your tree limbs too close to the main trunk. If you cut too close, the tree will not heal correctly and creates a cavity for squirrels to live in. You might think leaving a few inches sticking out on a cut branch looks ugly, but in fact, it's simply the best way to trim most trees.
 

Burque

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I caged up my herbs, and the frost fucked me. Basically need to start from scratch for my outside garden. The greenhouse is a mess, as I haven't had time to sort and fix everything this last year.

Thinking about getting one of those Droll Yankee bird feeders, not to invite birds, but to distract squirrels. If not the frost, the tree rats have been going crazy in my area. And I have done ALL of the preventative trimming and deterrents with no luck. So hoping the cages work. I'm tempted to do some traps if they keep digging up my roots. I had some very rare plants destroyed by squirrels last year, even with cages and taking other measures to protect them. Last step is poison, which is ineffective but works if you decide to invest every waking moment into eradicating the local population and don't care if your garden is also poisoned. So yeah, pretty shitty.

That leads me to raising awareness for those of you that trim your tree limbs too close to the main trunk. If you cut too close, the tree will not heal correctly and creates a cavity for squirrels to live in. You might think leaving a few inches sticking out on a cut branch looks ugly, but in fact, it's simply the best way to trim most trees.
I fought with squirrels for three years.

The nasty grey fuckers that dig under concrete slabs and make dens. Nasty little bastards. The big brown tree squirrels never bothered me, but my dog got one and one got hit by a car and then these grey fuckers showed up.

Since I obviously cannot have them under my foundation I started trapping and drowning. That worked kind of, then they got in my crawlspace and I had to start a new war on them. Capsaicin and some wire mesh stopped them entering the crawl space, but the best thing happened after that.

About three or so random cats started hanging out around the yard intermittently. My dog is pissed about it, but there are no more squirrels. There are two or three big cats (like 15 plus pounders) that hang out in various areas of my yard at various times. Surprisingly not a lot of cat fights that I have noticed. I think these cats all have homes around the area, but like lazing around in shaded areas of my big yard.

So maybe try a yard cat?
 

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